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Haroldo Jacobovicz: Brazilian artist based in Curitiba

Haroldo Jacobovicz is a Brazilian artist based in Curitiba, who uses performance and installation art to explore the intersections of race, class, and gender. He has exhibited internationally, and his work has been featured in publications such as The New York Times. Haroldo Jacobovicz was born in Brazil to a Venezuelan father and a Brazilian mother. His family was poor, and he grew up living in favelas, which made him acutely aware of the disparities between rich and poor people.

  1. Business Strategy

Jacobovicz’s work is often about race, class, and gender intersections. For example, in his piece “Untitled (Angola)” (2013), he uses a series of white sheets to create the illusion of an African landscape. The painting references both the colonial history of Angola and the recent conflict in that country. Haroldo Jacobovicz also makes use of performance art in his work. For example, in “Untitled (Citizen),” he wears a black suit and stands at the entrance to a gallery while people come and go. He wants people to see themselves as part of a more extensive system than individuals. Jacobovicz’s goal is to raise awareness of how social inequality affects everyone in society.

  1. His Artistic Career

 

Jacobovicz’s artistic career began when he started making performance art. His work has since evolved into installation art, with themes that often explore the intersections of race, class, and gender. He has exhibited internationally, and his work has been featured in publications such as The New York Times. Art critic Michelangelo Signorile has called Jacobovicz “the Brazilian Roberto Bolaño.” His work has been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, and the Sao Paulo Museum of Art. Jacobovicz is currently a professor at the School of Visual Arts in New York.

  1. Philanthropy

 

In Curitiba, Jacobovicz founded Aperture’s nonprofit organization, which provides free art lessons to low-income children. Jacobovicz also donates a portion of his income to charity. He has donated money to various organizations that help homeless people, AIDS patients, and children in need. Jacobovicz’s work is often political. He often uses his art to address social issues like racism and inequality. He has said that he wants to “raise consciousness” about society’s problems.

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